Movie Countdown

"Always make the audience suffer as much as possible."- Alfred Hitchcock/ Mariana. Irreversibly in love with the seventh art.

Perhaps this is what it means to go mad: to be emptied and to be aware of the emptiness.

—David Foster Wallace (via likeafieldmouse)

(via alfredshitchcock)

Happy 55th Birthday, Emma Thompson!

b. 15th April 1959

"I’m not fiddling about with myself. We’re in this awful youth-driven thing now where everybody needs to look 30 at 60. The trick is to age honestly and make it look great so that everyone looks forward to it."

(Source: merylstreeeps, via just--film)

The real horror is to show that we all live unconsciously in fear. Many people suffer today from a fear that they don’t begin to analyze and which is constant. When the audience is in the dark and recognizes its own insecurity in that of the characters of the film, then you can show unbelievable situations and be sure that the audience will follow. For another thing, people love to be afraid. It’s strange, when we’re children, we say to our nurse or to our parents: “Frighten us,” and we love that. These fears stay in us all our life: we’re afraid of thunder, we’re afraid of darkness, of the unknown, of death. The horror film, if it’s well done, awakens in the mind of the audience this fear that it didn’t know it had in it, and this discovery makes it shiver.

—Jacques Tourneur (via ikaristwin)

(via gyllenhaled)

I mean, Joffrey, as monstrous as he is — and certainly he’s just as monstrous in the books as he is in the TV show, and Jack has brought some incredible acting chops to the role that somehow makes him even more loathsome than he is on the page — but Joffrey in the books is still a 13-year-old kid. And there’s kind of a moment there where he knows that he’s dying and he can’t get a breath and he’s kind of looking at Tyrion and at his mother and at the other people in the hall with just terror and appeal in his eyes—you know, “Help me mommy, I’m dying.” And in that moment, I think even Tyrion sees a 13-year-old boy dying before him. So I didn’t want it to be entirely, “Hey-ho, the witch is dead.” I wanted the impact of the death to still strike home on to perhaps more complex feelings on the part of the audience, not necessarily just cheering.

thatwetshirt:

Schindler’s List (1993)

When Steven Spielberg chose Liam Neeson to play Oskar Schindler in his all‑important new film, Schindler’s List, he told him, “I’m going to give you the best introduction in a movie that any actor ever had.” And he has.

In the establishing shots, you watch, from the back, a tall man dressing for dinner with meticulous care. You see a hand reaching for a pair of gold cufflinks. An enamel swastika is pinned to a satin lapel. Cut to a club where the maitre d’ approaches eagerly and leads him to a table. As the camera swings around for the first time, revealing the handsome face of Oskar Schindler, he is smiling knowingly at the available woman at the next table. (x)

(via sublimecinema)